PROMOTIONCommon lawmarriage-the myth!id you know there is no such thing as a 'common lawmarriage? It seems a fairly widespread belief that ifyou live with your partner for long enough, you willsomehowacquire the same rights as a married person.This is not true! There are vast differences between the rights of amarried person and an unmarried person. A married person canmake financial claims in the context of a divorce over the capital andincome of their spouse. An unmarried person has no such claimsThey may be able to make a claim against their partner's propertyin limited circumstances or they may be able to make a claim forprovision for their children, if they have any. Other than this, theyhave no financial claims. This can lead to terrible outcomes.For example, a woman who is separating from her partner, may havestayed at home and devoted herself to bringing up the children. Ifthechildren are grown up, she will not have a claim for their provisionand she may not have any claims to any of her partner's property.She would have no claim for mainternance. She could be left withnothing other than what is in her sole name.In England and Wales, when married couples divorce or civilpartners break up, both parties have a legalclaims to maintenanceand their share of assets, including property. The Court has awide discretion to take all the circumstances and history of therelationship into account and decide on a fair division. Cohabitingcouples have no such rights to any financial support iftherelationship breaks down, regardless of the number of years theyhave been together and whether they have chikdren.If the couple do not have a Declaration of trust for any propertythey might co-own, should a dispute arise they may find themselveshaving to navigate their way through complex laws of trusts to workout how much of a share in the property they might be entitled to. Notonly is this problematic, it will require expert, legal advice to resolve.To avoid such issues it is a good idea for any couple who arethinking of moving in together to enter into a "Living TogetherAgreement. This can record at the outset what might happen in theunfortunate event their relationship breakdown and prevent anyproblems arising. It can cover howyou will support your children,over and above any legal requirements to maintain them, as well ashow you would deal with bank accounts, debts and significant jointpurchases. Whilst it is not the most romantic way to take the nextstep in your relationship, knowing all the practicalities have beenaddressed gives peace of mind and securityNatLesterAssociate Family SolicitorDebenhams OttawayT: 01727 735612E: ni@debenhamsottaway.co.ukW: debenhamsottaway.co.ukDEBENHAMS 01TAWAYSOLICITORSYour aspirations are our inspiration PROMOTION Common law marriage-the myth! id you know there is no such thing as a 'common law marriage? It seems a fairly widespread belief that if you live with your partner for long enough, you will somehowacquire the same rights as a married person. This is not true! There are vast differences between the rights of a married person and an unmarried person. A married person can make financial claims in the context of a divorce over the capital and income of their spouse. An unmarried person has no such claims They may be able to make a claim against their partner's property in limited circumstances or they may be able to make a claim for provision for their children, if they have any. Other than this, they have no financial claims. This can lead to terrible outcomes. For example, a woman who is separating from her partner, may have stayed at home and devoted herself to bringing up the children. Ifthe children are grown up, she will not have a claim for their provision and she may not have any claims to any of her partner's property. She would have no claim for mainternance. She could be left with nothing other than what is in her sole name. In England and Wales, when married couples divorce or civil partners break up, both parties have a legalclaims to maintenance and their share of assets, including property. The Court has a wide discretion to take all the circumstances and history of the relationship into account and decide on a fair division. Cohabiting couples have no such rights to any financial support ifthe relationship breaks down, regardless of the number of years they have been together and whether they have chikdren. If the couple do not have a Declaration of trust for any property they might co-own, should a dispute arise they may find themselves having to navigate their way through complex laws of trusts to work out how much of a share in the property they might be entitled to. Not only is this problematic, it will require expert, legal advice to resolve. To avoid such issues it is a good idea for any couple who are thinking of moving in together to enter into a "Living Together Agreement. This can record at the outset what might happen in the unfortunate event their relationship breakdown and prevent any problems arising. It can cover howyou will support your children, over and above any legal requirements to maintain them, as well as how you would deal with bank accounts, debts and significant joint purchases. Whilst it is not the most romantic way to take the next step in your relationship, knowing all the practicalities have been addressed gives peace of mind and security Nat Lester Associate Family Solicitor Debenhams Ottaway T: 01727 735612 E: ni@debenhamsottaway.co.uk W: debenhamsottaway.co.uk DEBENHAMS 01TAWAY SOLICITORS Your aspirations are our inspiration

Date: 16 June 2019

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PROMOTION Common law marriage-the myth! id you know there is no such thing as a 'common law marriage? It seems a fairly widespread belief that if you live with your partner for long enough, you will somehowacquire the same rights as a married person. This is not true! There are vast differences between the rights of a married person and an unmarried person. A married person can make financial claims in the context of a divorce over the capital and income of their spouse. An unmarried person has no such claims They may be able to make a claim against their partner's property in limited circumstances or they may be able to make a claim for provision for their children, if they have any. Other than this, they have no financial claims. This can lead to terrible outcomes. For example, a woman who is separating from her partner, may have stayed at home and devoted herself to bringing up the children. Ifthe children are grown up, she will not have a claim for their provision and she may not have any claims to any of her partner's property. She would have no claim for mainternance. She could be left with nothing other than what is in her sole name. In England and Wales, when married couples divorce or civil partners break up, both parties have a legalclaims to maintenance and their share of assets, including property. The Court has a wide discretion to take all the circumstances and history of the relationship into account and decide on a fair division. Cohabiting couples have no such rights to any financial support ifthe relationship breaks down, regardless of the number of years they have been together and whether they have chikdren. If the couple do not have a Declaration of trust for any property they might co-own, should a dispute arise they may find themselves having to navigate their way through complex laws of trusts to work out how much of a share in the property they might be entitled to. Not only is this problematic, it will require expert, legal advice to resolve. To avoid such issues it is a good idea for any couple who are thinking of moving in together to enter into a "Living Together Agreement. This can record at the outset what might happen in the unfortunate event their relationship breakdown and prevent any problems arising. It can cover howyou will support your children, over and above any legal requirements to maintain them, as well as how you would deal with bank accounts, debts and significant joint purchases. Whilst it is not the most romantic way to take the next step in your relationship, knowing all the practicalities have been addressed gives peace of mind and security Nat Lester Associate Family Solicitor Debenhams Ottaway T: 01727 735612 E: ni@debenhamsottaway.co.uk W: debenhamsottaway.co.uk DEBENHAMS 01TAWAY SOLICITORS Your aspirations are our inspiration PROMOTION Common law marriage-the myth! id you know there is no such thing as a 'common law marriage? It seems a fairly widespread belief that if you live with your partner for long enough, you will somehowacquire the same rights as a married person. This is not true! There are vast differences between the rights of a married person and an unmarried person. A married person can make financial claims in the context of a divorce over the capital and income of their spouse. An unmarried person has no such claims They may be able to make a claim against their partner's property in limited circumstances or they may be able to make a claim for provision for their children, if they have any. Other than this, they have no financial claims. This can lead to terrible outcomes. For example, a woman who is separating from her partner, may have stayed at home and devoted herself to bringing up the children. Ifthe children are grown up, she will not have a claim for their provision and she may not have any claims to any of her partner's property. She would have no claim for mainternance. She could be left with nothing other than what is in her sole name. In England and Wales, when married couples divorce or civil partners break up, both parties have a legalclaims to maintenance and their share of assets, including property. The Court has a wide discretion to take all the circumstances and history of the relationship into account and decide on a fair division. Cohabiting couples have no such rights to any financial support ifthe relationship breaks down, regardless of the number of years they have been together and whether they have chikdren. If the couple do not have a Declaration of trust for any property they might co-own, should a dispute arise they may find themselves having to navigate their way through complex laws of trusts to work out how much of a share in the property they might be entitled to. Not only is this problematic, it will require expert, legal advice to resolve. To avoid such issues it is a good idea for any couple who are thinking of moving in together to enter into a "Living Together Agreement. This can record at the outset what might happen in the unfortunate event their relationship breakdown and prevent any problems arising. It can cover howyou will support your children, over and above any legal requirements to maintain them, as well as how you would deal with bank accounts, debts and significant joint purchases. Whilst it is not the most romantic way to take the next step in your relationship, knowing all the practicalities have been addressed gives peace of mind and security Nat Lester Associate Family Solicitor Debenhams Ottaway T: 01727 735612 E: ni@debenhamsottaway.co.uk W: debenhamsottaway.co.uk DEBENHAMS 01TAWAY SOLICITORS Your aspirations are our inspiration